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Fascinating maps of religious population density

These are really cool.

I didn't realize that so many religions were so regionally oriented.

That's a whole lotta red

Blogged at http://www.connorboyack.com/blog/americas-regional-religions.

As I wrote on my post, I'd be very curious to see the same graphic, but with color intesity representing the activity rates of each county of church-going members. The colors would all be a lot less bright...

It makes sense

It makes sense that they are regionalized. Religion is much more of a social/cultural thing than a spiritual thing. Always has been, always will be.

cboyback, what do you mean by "activity"? Maybe some religions don't focus on Mia Maid attendace as much as others. ;)

So that's why

So that's why they call it the bible belt.

Interesting.

Interesting.

Giggle

It makes sense that they are regionalized. Religion is much more of a social/cultural thing than a spiritual thing. Always has been, always will be.

Your certainty is cute.

It would look cuter with something to back it up, besides a blanket.

cboyback, what do you mean by "activity"? Maybe some religions don't focus on Mia Maid attendace as much as others. ;)

Do I sense a resentful heart? Someone with an embittered vendetta? :)

"There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." - Hamlet, Shakespeare

Activity

By activity I mean regular church attendance, which is a corollary of most of the world's predominant religions.

Back in San Diego (where I'm from), there was a catholic cathedral across the street from our chapel. On Easter Sunday and Christmas, the police would have to come and direct traffic because there would be a massive influx of church-goers. Other than that, there were maybe a couple dozen, if that. So while activity does not necessarily connote regular attendance of Mia Maid activities, it does connote going to church to worship as part of the religion you profess to belong to.

It makes sense that they are

It makes sense that they are regionalized. Religion is much more of a social/cultural thing than a spiritual thing. Always has been, always will be.

Your certainty is cute.

It would look cuter with something to back it up, besides a blanket.

Sounds pretty reasonable to me. How is this a blanket statement? Did you look at the map? That pretty much confirms that religious choice is geographically distributed. Course, nobody here would possibly suggest that people join churches because their friends and families do...

nah

Nah, I just don't feel up to the task to back up my assertion. History is good enough for me. I don't have the energy to do a little book report for you, especially considering the map above that you can click on.

But just for kicks, I'll name a region, and you tell me what religion comes to mind. Deal?

Utah
Mississippi
Europe
Middle East
India
China
Japan
Brazil

Any questions?

Straw man argument...

...unless you explain the relationship between geographic distribution and the argument that a religion is more of a social/cultural thing than spiritual.

To me it makes sense that religion is geographically distributed, considering that physical presence directly affects proselitying efforts. But stretching it to being a social thing instead of a spiritual one, well, there is a lot of assumptions that need backing up before such a claim can hold water.

Course, nobody here would possibly suggest that people join churches because their friends and families do...

I don't argue that...I just argue your "social" conversion argument.

Again, makes sense, since conversion (including real spiritual conversion, not just your "social" kind) is much easier when proselitying is present, and a very effective way of proselitying in found in family sharing. Even further, spiritual experiences find a pretty important boost within family circles, given the already existent, more intimate spiritual synergy that exist in many families. Thus, what this means is that family influence is a pretty good way of achieving 100% spiritual conversion (and not just "social").

But what do I know...who am I kidding...I just merely served a mission. Everybody knows that looking maps from a class website give you a better perspective of things, especially of the nature of conversion ;)

"There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." - Hamlet, Shakespeare

Straw man argument... unless

Straw man argument... unless you explain the relationship between the geographic distribution and the argument that a religion is more of a social/cultural thing than spiritual.

It goes both ways. Can you explain the relationship between spirituality and religion? Not what it should be, but what it really is? Do you have empirical evidence that people join particular sects because they choose that doctrine rather than joining because of social/cultural reasons?

To me it makes sense that religion is geographically distributed, considering that physical presence directly affects proselitying efforts.

Yeah, except besides Mormons and JW's, there isn't a whole lot of proselyting going on at all.

But stretching it to being a social thing instead of a spiritual one, well, there is a lot of assumptions that need backing up before such a claim can hold water.

See, I would look at it the other way. I assume that it's social and if you want to claim it's a spirtual connection rather than social, there are a lot of assumptions that need backing up before such a claim can hold water. I don't think the map here is showing anything about conversion, just membership. Big difference.

But what do I know...who am I kidding...I just merely served a mission.

Hate to break it to you, but if that's your qualification, 90% of the folks on ProvoPulse are in the same boat.